Recording Perceived data for each diversity characteristic

Remember: For scripted shows, the diversity characteristics of the character, not the actor, should be recorded.

Gender

It will generally be straightforward to determine if a person is?male?or?female.

Use ?Other? for people who are Intersex, have non-binary gender, etc. (In practice, this category is unlikely to be used often, except where a person on screen explicitly describes their gender in this way.)

Use ?Don?t Know? when, for example, a person?s face is obscured and they don?t speak, and it?s not possible to determine their gender.

Gender identity

Gender identity is a person?s private, subjective experience of their own gender. The?Perceived Formgives the option to record that a?contributor?s?gender identity differs from the gender assigned to them at birth, and should be used for people who explicitly identify themselves as transgender within the programme. You should never guess someone?s gender identity. If there are no explicit references made by or about the person or character, then you should not tick the ?Trans? tick-box.

Age

Guessing a character or?contributor?s?age is an imperfect art, but you should always make your own personal judgement of the most relevant age band based on what you are seeing or hearing on the screen. For non-scripted shows, you must not look up information on a person online or from other sources. If there is no way of determining or estimating a contributor?s age, you should record ?Don?t Know?.

Note: for people whose perceived ages are recorded as being under 13 (or ?Don?t Know?), perceptions of sexual orientation and gender identity will not be requested.

Ethnicity

It is not always straightforward to perceive ethnicity on screen. Make your own judgement based on what you see or hear. Don?t look up information on a person online or from other sources.

The options to select from are described in more detail as follows:

  • White. This includes people who are English / Welsh / Scottish / Northern Irish / British, Irish, Gypsy or Irish Traveller, Central and Eastern European or any other White background, which can also include those from Western European countries such as Spain, Italy, France and Portugal.
  • Mixed / Multiple ethnic groups. This includes people from mixed heritage backgrounds, such as White and Black Caribbean, White and Black African, White and Asian, as well as any other Mixed / Multiple ethnic background. The White and Black Caribbean and White and Black African groups are typically the most easily defined in terms of perceived ethnicity, reflecting dual or mixed White British and Black Caribbean / Black African parentage. The ethnicity of White and Asian groups can be less clear, as it includes groups with parents who themselves come from diverse countries across Asia (e.g. India, Pakistan, China, Japan, Korea, Malaysia or other South East Asian countries). Other mixed / multiple backgrounds could also include any combination of the groups outlined in this section e.g. Black British and British Asian and so on.
  • East Asian / East Asian British. This includes people from any East Asian or any South East Asian countries (e.g. Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Japan, Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, North Korea, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam). East Asian British refers to British born people with any of these heritages or cultural backgrounds.
  • South Asian / South Asian British.?This includes people from South Asian countries (e.g. Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka). South Asian British refers to British born people with any of these heritages or cultural backgrounds.
  • Black / African / Caribbean / Black British.?This includes a range of people from Caribbean countries (e.g. Jamaica, Trinidad, Dominica, Barbados) and countries across Africa (e.g. Ghana, Nigeria, Somalia, Kenya). Black British refers to British born people with any of these heritages or cultural backgrounds. It also includes people with any other Black / African/ Caribbean background.
  • Other ethnic group.?This refers to people not covered by ethnic groups in the categories above, or a combination of any of the above groups (e.g. people from Arab or Middle Eastern backgrounds; or Inuit communities, who might be a part of a programme on the Arctic).

Sexual orientation

A person?s sexual orientation ? whether they are straight, gay, etc. ? should only be recorded when it is deliberately revealed, i.e. when there is an explicit reference to it or when it becomes evident to the viewer (through clear audio or visual references). For example, a character or?contributor?may refer to their sexual orientation or to their membership of a particular community. There may also be objective information from a storyline, for example when a person?s partner is referenced or appears on screen.

You should not make judgements based on whether someone acts in a stereotypical way. For non-scripted shows, don?t look up information on a person online or from other sources, or use information on a person?s sexual orientation even when it is (or believed to be) common knowledge. For example, if a well-known gay figure appears in a show in which their sexual orientation is not referenced in any way, you should record ?Don?t Know?.

When there are no references to a person?s sexual orientation ?Don?t Know? should be recorded. In many shows, this will be the case for the majority, or even all, people on-screen.

While there will be instances when you cannot rule out the possibility that someone may be bisexual, you may record them as being straight or gay so long as there is clear evidence (in the ways described above) of their attraction to people of the opposite or same gender, membership of a particular community, etc. You should only record a character or contributor as bisexual when there is an explicit reference in the programme to their bisexuality or when it becomes evident to the viewer through clear audio or visual references.

The ?Other? category is for people whose sexual orientation falls outside the most commonly defined categories. In practice, this category is unlikely to be used often, except where a person on-screen explicitly describes their sexual orientation in this way.

Disability

A person?s disability should be recorded when it is clearly referenced or becomes evident to the viewer (either through explicit audio or visual references, or references in the storyline). For non-scripted shows, don?t look up information on a person online or from other sources.

The Equality Act 2010 defines a disabled person as someone who has a physical or mental impairment that has a substantial and long-term impact on their ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.

The?Diamond?disability categories are as follows (more than one may be selected if appropriate):

  • Deaf or hard of hearing
  • Blind or visually impaired
  • Musculo-skeletal:?includes coordination, dexterity, mobility, wheelchair-user
  • Mental health:?includes serious depression, bipolarity
  • Learning and cognitive disabilities:?includes dyslexia, Down?s Syndrome, autism
  • Long-term illness or debilitating disease:?for example, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, arthritis, cancer
  • Other:?includes physical or mental conditions such as speech impairments, facial disfigurement. Drug / substance abuse and alcoholism do not count as disabilities.

When there are no such references, then ?No apparent disability? should be recorded. In many shows, this will be the case for the majority, or even all, of the people on screen.